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2010

Sudan Debt Dynamics: Status Quo,Southern Secession, Debt Division, and Oil—A Financial Framework for the Future

This paper contributes to discussions about the role of Sudan‘s $35 billion in external debt obligations – both for a unified Sudan and a possible Southern secession. It examines Sudan‘s existing debt dynamics and the potential eligibility for traditional debt relief and multilateral debt relief initiatives. It also provides an indicative roadmap for clearing Sudan‘s loan arrears of $30 billion and potentially securing comprehensive debt relief in the future.

Declaration Juba Oil Conference

On 7-8 December 2010, the conference “Sudan's Oil Industry After the Referendum” was held in Juba. The conference was attended by well over 100 representatives of the GOSS, communities, SSLA, CNPC, Total S.A, the Churches, civil society organisations, the academic community, and others. This is the final declaration of the Conference with specific recommendations to the GOSS for immediate and decisive action.

Post Referendum Arrangements for Sudan's Oil Industry

Negotiations for Sudan’s future after the Comprehensive Peace Agreement started in earnest on 23 June 2010 with the signing of an MOU by the NCP and SPLM that lays down the modalities for resolving post-referendum issues and arrangements. This document identifies key issues affecting the petroleum industry that will emerge during the post-referendum negotiations. It points out the crucial factors and makes recommendations with a view to unleashing Sudan’s oil industry potential to contribute to peace and equitable development. It is meant to inform the wider public and discussions in the Working Group on Financial and Economic Issues & Natural Resources.

Sudan's oil industry on the eve of the referendum

On 6 July, negotiations for post-referendum arrangements started in Khartoum. Finance play a key role in these negotiations. Sudan’s substantial oil industry is the dominant money-maker for the country’s two governments and to split it up will be an extremely complex and sensitive operation. The significant wealth that oil generates is equally important to both parties and if they agree on a mutually satisfactory formula, oil could be the foundation for a peaceful future. The time is now ripe to seize the opportunity to make the country’s natural resources benefit the people.
This report presents an overview of facts and trends in Sudan’s petroleum industry and highlights key challenges for the coming period.

Caught in the Middle: China and India in Sudans Transition

China and India have also followed a necessary hedging strategy by establishing quasi-diplomatic relations with the Government of Southern Sudan in Juba. This marks a major shift in policy from dealing exclusively with the central government. However, this does not leave them invulnerable to present uncertainties revolving around Sudan’s potential split. Due to its economic role in Sudan, China in particular is in a unique position to promote a peaceful transition.

Questions in Dutch Parliament about Lundin in Sudan

Two members of the Dutch Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA) submitted questions in Parliament on June 11th about the alleged complicity of the Swedish oil company Lundin in human rights abuses in Sudan and the relationship between the Dutch Government and Lundin's activities in The Netherlands (text translated from Dutch by ECOS).

ECOS open letter to shareholders of Lundin Petroleum

ECOS' reaction to the letter of Lundin Petroleum to its shareholders, reiterating the report UNPAID DEBT contains critical new evidence to support our position that Lundin, Petronas and OMV have violated norms of international law in Sudan.

UNPAID DEBT The Legacy of Lundin, Petronas and OMV in Sudan, 1997-2003

A comprehensive overview of the role of the Lundin Consortium in the oil war. ECOS calls upon the Swedish, Austrian and Malaysian governments to investigate whether, as a matter of international law, Lundin, OMV and Petronas 'were complicit in the commission of war crimes and crimes against humanity by others during the period 1997-2003.’ In response, the Swedish Public Prosecutor for International crimes opened a criminal investigation into ‘links between Sweden and the reported crimes’. The investigation is likely to be focusing on senior managers and members of the Board of Directors of Lundin Petroleum.

UNPAID DEBT The Legacy of Lundin, Petronas and OMV in Sudan, 1997-2003 (text only)

A comprehensive overview of the role of the Lundin Consortium in the oil war. ECOS calls upon the Swedish, Austrian and Malaysian governments to investigate whether, as a matter of international law, Lundin, OMV and Petronas 'were complicit in the commission of war crimes and crimes against humanity by others during the period 1997-2003.’ In response, the Swedish Public Prosecutor for International crimes opened a criminal investigation into ‘links between Sweden and the reported crimes’. The investigation is likely to be focusing on senior managers and members of the Board of Directors of Lundin Petroleum. TEXT ONLY VERSION